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Will McDonald’s start selling a McMarijuana burger?

In the run-up to the legalization of marijuana, there are issues that I hope will be covered in the legislation. Some SHOULD be obvious.

How are police and the courts going to deal with the rise in cases of impaired by drug while operating a motor vehicle that we will surely see? Of course we already have people driving cars while stoned, but once marijuana is legal, will we see a rise? This of course, will necessitate setting a legal limit for diving, just like with alcohol, and police will need effective reliable roadside screening devices to test for sobriety.

Currently police are testing a roadside screening device, but most have to rely on the qualified opinions of drug recognition experts for roadside screening, which can be followed up with a blood test if necessary (a complicated process).

Will the issue of consuming or smoking marijuana only in licenced establishments and private residences be a part of the legislation? Surely, we won’t have people simply walking down the street puffing on a refer (or driving a car) when it’s currently illegal to walk down the street with a beer? Or will that be legalized too?

Will you be prohibited from smoking in a car with children, just as tobacco is currently prohibited?

Is the legislation going to allow the medical marijuana industry to proactively advertise the fact that marijuana doesn’t need to be smoked to get the medicinal benefits? Medical marijuana can be taken in pill form, in food, by vapour oils or sprays. Surprisingly, the medicinal industry are currently prohibited from publicly advertising the different methods of taking their products.

Will the medicinal industry also be able to publicly emphasize that not all types of marijuana are psychoactive, thus will not get you high? While THC, the substance that gets you high, can have some medicinal benefits, the chemical cannabidiol (CBD) is commonly found in medicinal marijuana and won’t get you high, no matter how much you ingest.

Even for medicinal users, too much THC can bring about irritable or psychotic mood swings, which is part of the reason that marijuana was made illegal in the first place.

I’ve also never understood why in a time when tobacco smoking is rapidly becoming a completely socially unacceptable activity, that marijuana smoking is basically being encouraged as a result of the push for legalization?

When marijuana is burned, 70% more carcinogens than in tobacco are produced. Why is it being presented by advocates as a benign substance?

Some advocated defiantly proclaim, “So what if I want to get high?” Well as long as you won’t be doing things like driving a car, operating heavy machinery or smoking it around children, that’s your business.

The usual argument is that getting stoned is better than getting drunk. OK, but neither are actually good for you over a long-term.

I guess we’ll just have to wait and see what happens in Justin’s new “High Canada”. I wonder if McDonald’s will start selling a McMarijuana burger.

 

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Medical marijuana questions need to be answered

 

Barrie Advance

8 September 2016

Re: Police raid storefront marijuana dispensaries, Sept. 1

Repeat after me: marijuana is still illegal.

OK, if marijuana dispensaries want to prove they are really dispensing medicine and not just allowing potheads to get their stash for the week, why have they not been more proactive in promoting the fact marijuana doesn’t need to be smoked to get the medicinal benefits. I say again, it doesn’t need to be smoked. Medical marijuana can be taken in pill form, in food, by vapour or sprays. Smoking is just a quicker delivery system, but not the only one.

Why doesn’t the industry also emphasize that not all types of marijuana are psychoactive, thus will not get you high? While tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the substance that gets you high, can have some medicinal benefits, the chemical cannabidiol (CBH) is more commonly found in medicinal marijuana and won’t get you high, no matter how much you ingest. I think medicinal advocates will have a better time winning over skeptics, who say medicinal users just want to get high, if they emphasize this fact.

Speaking of smoking, in a time when tobacco smoking is rapidly becoming a completely socially unacceptable activity, I’ve never understood why is marijuana smoking basically being encouraged as a result of the push for legalization? Why is it being presented by some as a benign substance? Shouldn’t we be discouraging smoking of any substance?

When marijuana is burned, 500 or so chemical compounds in the marijuana can produce hundreds of byproducts, some of them carcinogens. Marijuana has 70 per cent more carcinogens than tobacco.

Researchers believe regular cannabis use can have neurotoxicity effects on maturing brains. A 2012 study by the National Academy of Sciences found heavy users can see as much as an eight-point drop in IQ scores, something that doesn’t happen with alcohol.

Even for medicinal users, too much THC can bring about irritable or psychotic mood swings, which is part of the reason marijuana was made illegal in the first place. As I said before, it’s not a benign plant. I always love it when someone says, “So what if I want to get high?” Well, as long as you won’t be doing things like driving a car, operating heavy machinery or smoking it around children, I guess that’s your business. It’s really no different than drinking. The usual argument continues with the smoker, stating that getting stoned is better than getting drunk. I would tend to agree, but I also think that neither is good in the end.

Bruce Forsyth, Barrie

This article appeared in the Barrie Advance on 8 September 2016 in response to the Barrie Police raids of two illegally operating marijuana shops.

The following comments were posted on the Barrie Advance web site  -http://www.simcoe.com/opinion-story/6845185-medical-marijuana-questions-need-to-be-answered/.  Both of them obviously missed the point of the article:

By Andrew | SEPTEMBER 08, 2016 11:23 AM

Smoking weed does not cause cancer. No marijuana smoker smokes 50 joints a day so the daily amount of tar is many many many times less than cigarettes. In addition studies have found marijuana smokers to have about the same per-capita instances of cancer, and much less than tobacco smokers. Weed and tobacco are not the same and do not deserve to be compared. Secondly, it’s none of your business how someone consumes medication. Are you going after suppositories next because it doesn’t suit you? Step off buddy and let live. You want to deny the pot smokers their weed, but you’re also harming patients who legitimately need this medication. Think about the damage your opinion, if enacted would do. Lastly, more research is your friend.
By James | SEPTEMBER 08, 2016 07:58 AM
You obviously have very little understanding on how phytocannabinoids interact within the human endocannabinoid system or else you would realize that daily medicinal cannabis use results in a gradual tolerance to the psychoactive effects of Cannabis but not the medical benefits. The fact that you use the term ‘pothead’ displays you discriminatory attitude against cannabis users and I find the term insulting and disgusting. Grow a BRAIN BEFORE WRITING YOUR NEXT ARTICLE. FYI Google ‘Cannabis, Apoptosis, angiogenesis” and learn something

 

The above article was edited for space limitations.  Below is the unedited version of the article:

Will McDonald’s start selling a McMarijuana burger?

August 2016

In the run-up to the legalization of marijuana, there are issues that I don’t seem to be hearing much of from the pro-legalization crowd, including our glorious leader, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.  Some are obvious, but others not so much.

How are the police and the courts going to deal with the rise in cases of impaired by drug while operating a motor vehicle that we will surely see?  Of course we already have people driving cars while stoned, but once marijuana is legal, I predict there will be a (likely temporary) rise in charges as those who wouldn’t smoke marijuana when it’s illegal will give it a try.  This of course, will necessitate setting a legal limit for diving, just like with alcohol, and police will need effective reliable roadside screening devices to test the sobriety of drivers.

Currently police are testing a roadside screening device, but most have to rely on the qualified opinions of drug recognition experts for roadside screening, which can be followed up with a blood test if necessary (a complicated process).

If the medical marijuana industry wants to prove they are really dispensing medicine and not just allowing potheads to get their stash for the week,  why have they not been more proactive in promoting the fact that marijuana doesn’t need to be smoked to get the medicinal benefits?  Medical marijuana can be taken in pill form, in food, by vapour or sprays.  Smoking is a quicker delivery system, but not the only one.

Why doesn’t the industry also emphasize that not all types of marijuana are psychoactive, thus will not get you high?  While THC, the substance that gets you high, can have some medicinal benefits, the chemical cannabidiol (CBD) is more commonly found in medicinal marijuana and won’t get you high, no matter how much you ingest. I think the medicinal advocates will have a better time winning over skeptics, who say medicinal users just want to get high, if they emphasize this fact.

Speaking of smoking, I’ve never understood in a time when tobacco smoking is rapidly becoming a completely socially unacceptable activity, why is marijuana smoking basically being encouraged as a result of the push for legalization?  Why is it being presented by some as a benign substance?  Shouldn’t we be discouraging smoking of any substance?

When marijuana is burned, 500 or so chemical compounds in the marijuana can produce hundreds of byproducts, some of them carcinogens.  Marijuana has 70 percent more carcinogens than tobacco.  Currently, it’s not illegal to smoke tobacco around children in your own home, unlike in a car, but will people be comfortable with children being exposed to marijuana smoke just because it’s legal?  Justin has stated he wants to keep marijuana out of the hands of children, but what about second-hand smoke?  Bottom line, smoking marijuana, and the resulting second-hand smoke, does have harmful effects.

Researchers believe regular cannabis use can have neurotoxicity effects on maturing brains.  In a 2012 study by the National Academy of Sciences found that heavy users can see as much as an 8 point drop in IQ scores, something that doesn’t happen with alcohol.

Even for medicinal users, too much THC can bring about irritable or psychotic mood swings, which is part of the reason that marijuana was made illegal in the first place.  As I said before, it’s not a benign plant.

I always love it when someone says, “So what if I want to get high?”  Well as long as you won’t be doing things like driving a car, operating heavy machinery or smoking it around children, I guess that’s your business.  It’s really no different than drinking.  The usual argument continues with the smoker stating that getting stoned is better than getting drunk.  I would tend to agree, but I also think that neither is good in the end.

I guess we’ll just have to wait and see what happens in Justin’s new “High Canada”.  I wonder if McDonald’s will start selling a McMarijuana burger.

 

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About the author

Bruce Forsyth

Bruce Forsyth served in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserve for 13 years (1987-2000). He served with units in Toronto, Hamilton & Windsor and worked or trained at CFB Esquimalt, CFB Halifax, CFB Petawawa, CFB Kingston, CFB Toronto, Camp Borden, The Burwash Training Area and LFCA Training Centre Meaford.

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