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QUÉBEC

Canadian Forces Base Montreal – Lasalle Detachment:

(Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Hochelaga)

Originally established as a Naval Supply Depot, it was constructed between 1951 and 1953 at 2555 Dollard Street in Lasalle.  The depot was officially commissioned on 1 October 1955 as HMCS Hochelaga. The depot took over functions previously handled by small depots in Rockcliffe, St. Hubert and Outremont.  Six large warehouses were constructed, along with administrative buildings, workshops and a heating plant.

Although staffed by RCN Officers, most of the depot staff were civilian employees, so no barracks were built at that time.  The depot was also home to the Aviation Supply Depot, which supplied the RCN aircraft carriers.

The H.M.C. Supply School re-located to HMCS Hochelaga after outgrowing their facilities in British Columbia.  Barracks, messes, classrooms and administrative buildings and a recreation hall were constructed for the school at the north end of the property.  Re-named the Naval Supply School, the school provided instructor on cooking, butchery, supply, accounting and civilian and military management.

The Naval Supply Depot, Aviation Supply Depot and the Naval Supply School were known collectively as the Naval Supply Centre.

With the Unification of the Forces, the HMCS Hochelaga was downgraded to a Detachment of CFB Montreal in 1966 and re-designated as No. 4 Supply Depot.  The Canadian Forces School of Management was established at the centre in September 1966.

In September 1968, the Naval Supply School merged with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps School and the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps School to form the new Canadian Forces School of Administration and Logistics at CFB Borden.

Also as a part of the Unification, No. 4 Supply Depot closed on 1 September 1970, with its functions being taken over by No. 25 Canadian Forces Supply Depot at Longue Pointe.

The CF School of Management relocated to CFB St-Jean in 1971 and the Lasalle base closed.  The property was sold to the Lasalle Industrial Development Corporation.

Today, the site is an industrial complex and a bus terminal for Montreal Transit.

All the supply depot buildings remain, along with the administrative building fronting onto Dollard Street, currently occupied by Cite Industrielle.  The former Naval School buildings are gone, replaced by the Montreal bus terminal.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak, the personal observations of the author (2016) and Google Maps (2014).


 

Naval Radio Station Fort Chimo:

Opened in 1949 as Naval Radio Station Fort Chimo as a High Frequency Direction Finding station.

NRS Fort Chimo had a brief existence as it closed in 1953. The station was replaced by NRS Frobisher Bay.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak & Canada’s National Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization web site – www.tscm.com.cse.html.

 


 

Naval Radio Station Chelsea:

Established in 1941 in co-operation with the National Research Council to test how radio communications were affected by the ionosphere.

The station closed in 1947 and its functions were taken over by the Defence Research Board.  Nothing remains today.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

His Majesty’s Canadian Ship D’Iberville:

Opened as a recruit training establishment in Quebec City in 1952 as His Majesty’s Canadian Ship D’Iberville. However HMCS D’Iberville had a brief existence, as it closed in 1961. The recruit school moved to LaSalle, Que.

Source Material: “Badges of the Canadian Navy” by LT (N) Graeme Arbuckle & “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Fort Ramsay:

Established on 1 May 1942 at Sandy Beach, on the southern shore of Gaspé Bay, the “ship” was established for convoy protection, ship control and area defence.

The base consisted of barracks, administration buildings, mess halls storage buildings and fuel tanks, along with a dedicated rail-line for delivery of supplies.

The RCAF and Canadian Army also shared the base, with a hangar for seaplanes and coastal-defence anti-aircraft batteries for protection, such as Fort Prével, Fort Haldimand and Fort Péninsule.

The army departed Fort Ramsay in  August 1944.  When the RCAF established a coastal radar network, Fort Ramsay became an important part of the network.

The RCN paid-off the base on March 31, 1946.

Some of the former Army and RCN buildings remain; the naval buildings still retaining their standard white and green paint colours.  The property is now a commercial-industrial area, the Sandy Beach Terminal of the Port of Gaspé.

The former naval administration building is now an apartment building, with an extra living floor created in the attic.

The former gun emplacements at Fort Peninsula remain, located at Forillon National Park.

The large RCAF hangar burned down years ago.

Source Material:  “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Saint-Hyacinthe:

Originally opened as No. 46 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre in October 1940, but camp was re-named No. 46 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre. One of the first regiments trained at the camp was the Regiment de St-Hyacinthe, a regiment that dates back to the Fenian Raids of 1866.

The following April, the Camp was re-named No. 46 Canadian Army (Advanced) Training Centre. On 1 October 1941, the camp was taken over by the Royal Canadian Navy for use as their communications school. The camp was re-named HMCS St.-Hyacinthe and some of the army tar-paper H-huts were replaced with white clapboard navy buildings.
The school trained ratings in visual, morse and radio communications. Both men and women trained at the school, although women were posted only to shore stations.
In 1943, the RCN’s radar training section in Halifax relocated to St.- Hyacinthe.
As the war was winding down in early 1945, the communications school closed, having trained over 3000 men and women, and HMCS St.-Hyacinthe became a naval discharge centre. A Canadian Nava Radio Laboratory was also opened at the station for the purpose of developing and improving radio equipment.
HMCS St.-Hyacinthe closed on 20 February 1946. Some of the barracks were used as a veteran’s tuberculosis sanatorium while the rest of the station was sold to J.A. & M. Cote Limited and the Quebec Government. The sanatorium closed in 1955.
Only a handful of the 73 buildings remain today, including a cold-storage warehouse on Avenue de la Marine.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak and the personal observations of the author (2016).

 


 

Royal Canadian Air Force Station Lachine:

Opened in September 1941 as a staging point for ferrying aircraft and supplies overseas for the war, as well as the home of No. 5 Manning Depot until 1943. The station remained open after World War II, becoming part of the post-war RCAF.

426 Transport Squadron re-formed at Lachine in March 1947, remaining until moving to Trenton 1 September 1959. 436 Transport Squadron re-formed at Dorval on 1 April 1949. Air Transport Command moved to RCAF Station Lachine from RCAF Station Rockcliffe in August 1951.

436 Transport Squadron moved to RCAF Station Downsview on 1 July 1956.

The station also provided support to No. 5 Communications Unit,  a communications relay station in the RCAF’s communications network located near St.-Jacquws-Le-Mineur.

RCAF Station Lachine closed on 12 September 1959. Air Transport Command re-located to RCAF Station Trenton on 12 September 1959. The former station became the Dorval Airport.

On 29 November 1975, Montréal-Mirabel Airport opened north-west of Montreal to handle an expected growth in international traffic and, eventually, to replace Dorval. That extra traffic never materialized, and due to its closer proximity to downtown Montreal, all scheduled air services have now returned to Dorval/Trudeau, while Mirabel ceased passenger operations in 2004.

In 2004, the airport was re-named Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

Source Material: 8 Wing Trenton News Releases – http://www.8wing.trenton.dnd.ca/archives/news110897.htm, “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak & History of the 400 Series Squadrons – http://www.airforce.dnd.ca/airforce/eng/history_400s/rcafsqns.htm.

 


 

Royal Canadian Air Force No. 5 Communications Unit:

In the mid-1950s, the RCAF established a new communications network, with one of the stations being located at RCAF Station Lachine in Dorval, west of Montreal.

The No. 5 Communications Unit site was opened in late 1955 on Chemin du Ruisseau-des-Noyers, north of St.-Jacques-Le-Mineur, to act as a relay transmitter station for communications between RCAF Station Lachine and other parts of Canada.  No. 5 CU was equipped with 15 FRT-501 transmitter units.

This location proved so ideal for radio communications as it was away from urban build-up that the Canadian Army opened the Delery Wireless Station within close proximity to the No. 5 CU site.

Each Communications Unit had separate transmitter and receiver stations, but the receiver station is unknown to the author.

No.5 CU was declared redundant after only 9 years and the station closed in December 1964.  It’s unknown exactly why No. 5 CU was slated for closure, but it likely was a combination of the closure of RCAF Station Lachine in September 1959 and the amalgamation of the individual service branch communications systems into the Canadian Forces Communications System in the run-up to the Unification of the mid-1960s.

Both the No.5 CU and Delery Wireless Station properties were sold to a Mr. Bertrand of DeLery. a few years after the closure.

The former No. 5 CU transmitter building is still standing, but is sealed up and abandoned.  One large transmitter tower remains standing behind the building, bot none of the other antennas remain.

For several decades the letters “Royal Canadian Air Force Transmitter Building” remained on the front of the building, but they were stolen by vandals sometime in the early 1990s.

An interesting side-note to the story of No. 5 CU is on 14 May 1963, the unit received orders to stock firearms for both their transmitter and receiver sites.  It’s unknown why this order was issued.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak and the personal observations of the author (2016).


 

Canadian Forces Station Val d’or:

The Royal Canadian Air Force established RCAF Station Val d’Or in 1954 as a fighter-interceptor base intended to protect Montreal and the St. Lawrence River valley and Great Lakes basin against Soviet bomber aircraft. The airfield was topped with asphalt by the mid-1950s as RCAF Station Val d’Or became a key component in NORAD.

During the early 1960s, RCAF Station Val-d’Or was considered as the site for one of the Regional Emergency Government Headquarters, commonly known as a “Diefenbunker”, but this was put at CFB Valcartier instead.

By 1964, the flying mission at RCAF Station Val-d’Or had changed to see all aircraft based at RCAF Station North Bay and RCAF Station Bagotville but were deployed to the base in rotations; in essence, RCAF Station Val-d’Or was now a forward operating base.

During the 1960s, RCAF Station Val-d’Or became home to numerous airborne nuclear weapons as RCAF CF-101 Voodoo interceptors were fitted with the AIR-2 Genie.

The rise of the FLQ terrorist group during this period saw the Canadian military devise strategies to safeguard nuclear ordnance primarily stored at RCAF Station Val-d’Or against being seized by the group’s members.

The Unification of the Forces resulted in the station being renamed CFS Val-d’Or.

CFS Val-d’Or saw its mission gradually decrease during the 1970s and it was closed in 1976.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

No. 4 Elementary Flying Training School:

Opened near Windsor Mills on 24 June 1940 under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The school closed on 25 August 1944.

The airfield no longer exists today.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

No. 11 Elementary Flying Training School:

Opened near Cap de la Madeline on 14 October 1940 under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The school closed on 11 February 1944.

Other than one h-hut, nothing remains of the aerodrome today.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 


 

No. 13 Service Flying Training School:

See Saint-Hubert Garrison – 5 Area Support Group in “Closed bases that still have a military presence“.

 


 

Royal Canadian Air Force Station Sept Iles:

 


 

Royal Canadian Air Force Detachment Saint-Honore:

Opened in June 1942 as Relief Landing Field for No. 1 Operational Training Unit at Baggotville under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

The Detachment closed on 5 January 1945.  The airfield now operates as the Chicoutimi/Saint-Honoré Aerodrome.  All three runways remain in use, one expanded to 6000 feet.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak, Google satellite photos (2014).

 


No. 9 Bombing & Gunnery School:
Opened near Mont-Joli in 1941, the station was one of the largest schools of the BCATP.  The aerodrome also served as an active anti-submarine station and home to No. 4 Repair Depot, No. 3 Construction and Maintenance Unit, NO. 1 Wireless Relay Detachment, along with a small contingent of the Lake Superior Regiment for coastal patrols.

No. 9 B&GS ceased operation in March 1945 and the aerodrome became home to No. 6 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Depot.  In December 1945, the depot closed and the aerodrome was transferred to the Department of Transportation.  It now operates as the Mont-Joli Airport.

Today, only one hangar, a vehicle shed and two of the three runways remain from the RCAF days.  The airport is currently the busiest airport in eastern Quebec.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak, Google satellite photos (2014).


 

Royal Canadian Air Force Detachment Pontiac:

Opened as the Relief Landing Field for No. 3 Flying Instructors School at Arnprior, Ontario, using grass runways.  The Detachment closed in 1945.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.

 

 


 

Central Equipment and Proving Establishment Detachment Ancienne Lorette:

No. 22 Elementary Flying Training School / No. 8 Air Observer School:

Opened at Ancienne Lorette, outside of Quebec city, in 1941 under the British Commonwealth Air Training plan.  The two schools were both opened on 29 September 1941 to train student pilots from all over the British Commonwealth and other allied countries, along with the United States, prior to America’s entry into WWII.

The two schools had all the usual amenities of an RCAF station including barracks, hangars, mess hall, hospital, stores recreation, drill hall and classrooms, but unlike most RCAF fields, did not have any Relief Landing Fields.  Instead, student pilots used the runways at No. 11 EFTS at Cap-de-la-Madeline for their circuit training.

By July 1942, an increased need for navigators lead to the consolidation and closure of a number of EFTS across Canada.  Those EFTS co-located with AOS were closed to allow the latter to expand their facilities.

As a moral-booster, HRH Princess Juliana of the Netherlands made a visit in October 1943.

No. 8 AOS closed on 30 April 1945 as the war was winding down.  No. 503 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite was established for the storage of Canso aircraft.

In 1946, the aerodrome was turned over to the Department of Transportation.  The Hospitaliers de St. Jean de Dieu and the Municipalite de la Petire-Riviere bought some of the former RCAF buildings and moved them off-site.

The aerodrome then became known as the Aéroport de l’Ancienne Lorette.

The RCAF returned to the aerodrome six years later when the Central Equipment and Proving Establishment Detachment Ancienne Lorette was established on 15 July 1952, to support the Canadian Armament research and Development Establishment at Camp Valcartier.  The staff consited of twelve officers, seventy-one airmen and one civilian.

The aerodrome also doubled as a re-deployment airfield for Air Defence Command, with the main runway being extended to 6000 feet.

The CEPE was disbanded in August 1964 and the RCAF departed from Ancienne Lorette.

All that remains from the RCAF days is one hangar, updated with new siding.  The RCAF still uses the airfield for its C-130 Hurcules aircraft to transport airborne troops.

The airport is now known as the Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak and the Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport web site – www.aeroportdequebec.com.

 


 

Canadian Forces Station La Macaza:

Originally opened in 1962 as a relief landing field for the RCAF, the aerodrome later became home to 447 SAM Squadron, armed with 29 nuclear tipped CIM-10 Bomarc missiles.  The station had all the amenities of an RCAF station, which included PMQs, a mess hall, barracks, recreation centre, administration building and a chapel.

In 1968, the station became CFS La Macaza, but this was short-lived as the station closed September 1972 following the removal of the Bomarc missiles.

The former station was transferred to the Department of Indian and Northern Development and turned into a school for native students.

In 1978, the former station was again transferred to the Correctional Service of Canada, becoming La Macaza Institution.  Although the PMQs were demolished, the rest of the station remains, including the missile coffins, which are used for storage purposes.

The airfield became a civilian airport, now known as the La Macaza – Mont Tremblant International Airport.

Source material:  “Abandoned Military Installations of Canada, Vol. II:  Quebec”, by Paul Ozorak.

 


Royal Canadian Air Force Detachment La Toque:

In the 1950s, RCAF’s Air Defence Command established several auxiliary landing fields for re-deployment of CF-100 fighter jets across the country.   RCAF Detachment La Toque was one such aerodrome.

The 5000 foot runway and buildings were transferred to the Department of Transportation in 1960 and today is the La Toque Airport.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.


Saint-Raymond Transmitter Station:

Opened in 1962, south of Saint-Raymond-de-Portneuf, as the remote communications bunker for the Quebec Government’s Emergency Operations Centre bunker at Camp Valcartier.

The one-level bunker was staffed by members of thee Royal Canadian Corps of Signals.

The bunker closed in  the early 1990s and was sealed up, but remains today.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.


No. 41 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre:

Established near Huntingdon as No. 41 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre on 9 October 1940.  The camp was re-named No. 41 Canadian Army (Recruit) Training Centre a month later.

The camp had all the usual amenities including barracks, lecture huts, stores, mess halls, a drill hall, administration buildings and Officers’ quarters.  Most had a sports field, swimming pool or skating rink.

Also known as Chateauguay Barracks, the camp had around 1418 trainees by August 1941, making it the largest army training camp.

No. 41 was originally intended as a training camp for just the Victoria Rifles and the Royal Montreal Regiment, but later regiments such as The Black Watch, Regiment de Chateauguay, Regiment de Hull and the Fusiliers Mont-Royal also trained their recruits at the camp.

The Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars RCAC also trained their recruits at Chateauguay briefly in 1941.

The camp was re-named No. 41 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre in March 1941 and continued operating as such until 30 November 1943, when recruit  ceased due to declining enrollment.

Chateauguay Barracks then became No. 4 Casualty Re-Training Centre, then a year later No. 4 Conditioning Centre, carefully chosen euphemisms for convalescent hospital.

The centre closed sometime around December 1945, when it became the Veterans Health and Occupational Centre for much of 1946.

Little remains of the former army camp today.  A few of the barracks were converted into private residences, located on Fairview Road, Pine Street and Cedar Street.  The local Legion Hall also appears to have been constructed using the old army buildings.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak, personal observations of the author (2017).


No. 42 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre:

Established near Joliette as No. 42 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre on 9 October 1940.  The camp was re-named No. 41 Canadian Army (Recruit) Training Centre a month later.

The camp, which was also called De Lanaudiere Barracks and Casernes de Lanaudiere, had all the usual amenities including barracks, lecture huts, stores, mess halls, a drill hall, administration buildings and Officers’ quarters, making up around 40 buildings.  Most had a sports field, swimming pool or skating rink.

De Lanaudiere Barracks also hosted Belgium troops, as did the training camp in Cornwall, Ontario.

De Lanaudiere Barracks became No. 42 CA(B)TC in March 1942, but by September 1943, the camp changed its focus due to a rise in illiterate recruits.  From this time on De Lanaudiere Barracks was known as No. 42 CA Educational (B) TC until it closed on January 1945.

The camp was sold to the City of Joliette.  Only five of the buildings remain today, now private residences on Rue Marguerite-Bourgeoys and Rue Alice.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.


No. 43 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre:

Established near Joliette as No. 43 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre on 9 October 1940.  The camp was re-named No. 41 Canadian Army (Recruit) Training Centre a month later.

Established in Sherbrooke as No. 43 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre on 9 October 1940.  The camp was re-named No. 44 Canadian Army (Recruit) Training Centre a month later and originally served as a training centre for the Regiment de Hull and the Regiment de Maisonneuve.

The camp, which was also called Camp Lord Sherbrooke, had all the usual amenities including barracks, lecture huts, stores, mess halls, a drill hall, administration buildings and Officers’ quarters.  Most had a sports field, swimming pool or skating rink.

The camp’s designation was once again changed in March 1941 to No. 43 CA(B)TC.

In 1943, an officer training program was added for some advanced field skills like mines and booby traps, fieldcraft, personal camouflage and battle first aid.

In November 1943, the camp changed to an infantry basic training centre, designated No. 43 CI(B)TC.  Camp Lord Sherbrooke continued in this function past the end of the war, re-named the 6th Infantry Training Battalion on i July 1945, until the camp was finally shut down on 31 January 1946. Camp Lord Sherbrooke was then sold to the Town of Sherbrooke.

Some of the barracks were used as housing and the drill hall was used as the public works garage.  Today, only the drill hall on Drummond Street remains.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak.


No. 44 Canadian Army (Basic) Training Centre/Canadian Officer Cadet and Basic Training Centre:

Established in Saint-Jérôme as No. 44 Non-permanent Active Militia Training Centre on 9 October 1940.  The camp was re-named No. 44 Canadian Army (Recruit) Training Centre a month later and originally served as a training centre for the Regiment de Hull and the Regiment de Maisonneuve.

The camp, which was also called Carillon Barracks, had all the usual amenities including barracks, lecture huts, stores, mess halls, a drill hall, administration buildings and Officers’ quarters.  Most had a sports field, swimming pool or skating rink.

The camp’s designation was once again changed in March 1941 to No. 44 CA(B)TC.

By November 1941, Carillon Barracks was chosen as one of two officer training schools (the other was in Brockville, Ontario).  Officer cadet recruits trained at Saint-Jerome before being sent to Brockville for a further three months training, in response to a need for French speaking officers to lead Quebec regiments.

The officer school was shut down on 27 July 1943 and Carillon Barracks switched to an instructor training school, S18 School of Army Instruction.

In December 1944, the camp reverted to a basic training centre, this time specifically for infantry, as No. 44 CI(B)TC.  Carillon Barracks continued in this function past the end of the war, re-named the 15th Infantry Training Battalion in January 1946, until the camp was finally shut down on 14 April 1946.  Carillon Barracks was then sold to the Town of Saint-Jérôme.

Today, the only thing that remains of Carillon Barracks is the former drill hall on Rue Fournier, which was occupied by a reserve battalion of the Royal 22e Régiment from 1964 to 1995.

A small park on Rue Labelle Saint-Jérôme was named in honor of the Royal 22e Régiment in 2013.

Source Material: “Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec” by Paul Ozorak and the Ville de Saint-Jérôme web site – www.vsj.ca.

 

 

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://militarybruce.com/abandoned-canadian-military-bases/abandoned-bases/quebec/

10 comments

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  1. v.wade

    can you tell me more about sd4 service depot in Longueuil Quebec and Huntington Quebec recruit training depot m y dad was stationed at these base and i am writing his bio… thank you and sincerely hope to hear from you!!

  2. Bruno Tremblay

    Thank you Bruce for putting this great website together. I had the great pleasure of serving at many of these closed or downsized bases and stations, from the early 70s to late 90s. Mont-Apica, Barrington, Toronto, Montreal, Masset, Chilliwack ect…the good old days with DND. When working hard and party hard still meant something. 🙂

    1. Bruce Forsyth

      Hi Bruno,

      Thanks for stopping by my web site. If you have any photos that you would be willing to share, I would love to see them.

      Bruce

      Bruce

  3. Louis Morin

    What hospitals in Quebec City did the Army Doctors do their residency in WwII helping injured Canadian and British soldiers off the ships?

    Thanks

    Lou Morin
    Calgary

    1. Bruce Forsyth

      Hi Louis,

      Thanks for stopping by my web site. Unfortunately I don’t have that information. You could try the Royal Canadian Medical Service School at CFB Borden.

      Bruce

  4. Michel Gabriel Vaillancourt

    Good Day,

    I have been up north Québec in the James Bay area for the past 20 years.

    Some first nation people told me about an old air force base use to be close to Chisasibi/Fort George at the time.
    This is located between them and the first nation of Whapmagoostui.
    Some old people told me about the name of CAPE JOHN but I am not sure. They told me it was there during the second world war and after.

    If you have information about that it will be nice of you to let me know.

    Regards,

    1. Bruce Forsyth

      Hi Michel,

      Thanks for stopping by my web site. I checked my copy of Abandoned Military Installations of Canada Vol II: Quebec, and I can’t find any reference to such an air force base. That said, looking at the location on Google Maps, if there was such a base there, it likely was an emergency landing field. I do see an abandoned airfield at the south end of Fort George, but I take it that’s not the location. I’ll see what else I can find. Do you have any more details?

      Bruce

      1. Michel Gabriel Vaillancourt

        Thanks Bruce,

        It is always hard up north to find exact information. I don’t think the first Nation at the time really document that kind of activity.

        The information about this location (Cape John) is from a friend of mine member of the Cree Nation of Chisasibi but he is born in Fort George in 1961. He said this airdrome location was during and or after the Second World War. He also mention to me about this airdrome in Fort George. Next time I’ll see him I will have more details.

        Just to let you know Fort George has been there since 1807 approximately. In the 70′ with the hydro Québec project all the community has been move to a brand new community call Chisasibi.

        Note: My interest related to airdrome and airport come from I am a former Military firefighter and I have work in 4 civilian airports in Quebec and in Kandahar Afghanistan Airfield in 2011-12 as a fire officer.

        I am always sad to see that our military aviation heritage has slowly deciphered. Lucky we have people like you to update and keep record of the history.

        Michel Gabriel Vaillancourt

  5. Norman Jaquemot

    Hi there. There used to be ten P.O.W. camps in Quebec. I know of the five on the south shore of Montreal, but I’d like to know if there was one near the plan bouchard in Ste-Thérèse, Quebec, and if there were others around that area. I’d like to know why there’s nothing mentionned about an airstrip on the Montreal north shore, halfway between Legardeur and Mascouche Qc. It’s now a recycling yard, but we found an airstrip and several abandoned roads that made a sort of village. I presumed it was one of these secret airbases destined to protect the Montreal east-end refineries in case of attack. You can send me infos on this subject at my e-mail : njaquemot@hotmail.com, but I doubt you’ll find anything. There was also a rumor of underground facilities near l’Épiphanie Quebec.

    1. Bruce Forsyth

      Hi Norman,

      I am not aware of a POW camp near Bouchard, just the ammunition depot. The airstrip near Legardeur does not appear to have been military. A good resource is the book Abandoned Military Installations of Canada Vol 2: Quebec by Paul Ozorak. Try to track down a copy of this book. Unfortunately I haven’t added all the bases listed in this book yet, but I am going through it now. I have added some entries to this web site and will get to the others when I can.

      Bruce

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